How to set marketing objectives when they aren’t buying Drop By Space article

How to set marketing objectives when they aren’t buying

Let’s look at how to set marketing objectives that are relevant when ‘selling’ isn’t the goal.

Not all marketing has the end goal of getting people to part with money and buy something; however, the principles and rules of marketing still apply.

If you’re marketing when they aren’t buying, let’s look at how to set marketing objectives that are relevant to your organisation.

1. Strategic Marketing Objectives

All strategic marketing objectives should contribute to achieving your organisation’s overall business goals. When the business goals focus on bringing in revenue, the strategic marketing objectives contribute to revenue.

If your organisation has goals that aren’t about bringing in money, your strategic marketing objectives still contribute to achieving these organisational goals. Let’s look at an example: 

Organisation Objective: To improve the physical health of women aged 25 to 35 in Manchester through having a more active lifestyle.

Possible Strategic Marketing Objectives: 

  1. To increase from 10% to 25%, the number of women aged 25 to 35 who walk at least 1 mile to work rather than drive or take public transport.
  2. To increase from 5% to 10% the number of women aged 25 to 35 who attend weekly free community running clubs.
  3. To increase from 25% to 50% the number of women aged 25 to 35 who walk at least 10,000 steps per day.

All of these three Strategic Marketing objectives, if achieved, will work together to help deliver the Organisation Objective. 

Analysis of what we’ve done: We made sure the Strategic Marketing Objectives were directly linked to achieving the Organisation Objectives. The key here is that the Organisation Objective is about behaviour change (rather than bringing in income). This means our strategic marketing objectives have to create that behaviour change. 

Top tip: Most non-financial organisation objectives are around getting people to think, feel or do something differently, so your non-financial strategic marketing objectives will be about this too. 

2. Tactical Marketing Objectives

Your Tactical Marketing Objectives are what you will do to achieve your Strategic Marketing Objectives.

I like to take one Strategic Marketing Objective and then systematically think about my goal for each stage of the Buyer’s Journey. These then form the basis of my Tactical Marketing Goals. 

Let’s use a simplified example from when I worked in the Fire and Rescue Service.

How to set marketing objectives when they aren’t buying Drop By Space article
Strategic Marketing Objective: Increase the number of people who have working smoke detectors in their homes in one specific district.

What I had to achieve at each stage of the Buyers’ Journey:

Unaware
How many people do we need to reach? Household data showed we had, for example, 1,000 households in this district. The national average shows only 1 in 5 households have a working smoke alarm. I wanted to increase this to 3 in 5 homes. This meant I had to get 200 households to take up our offer of fitting free working smoke alarms, so the total in that district would be 300 in 1000 homes with a working smoke alarm.

Tactical Marketing Goal: To get 200 households to have working smoke alarms across one specific district.

Aware
For every behaviour campaign we ran, only 10% of people who saw the campaign changed their behaviour. Therefore, to get 200 households to fit a smoke alarm, we need to reach 2,000 homes. 

Tactical Marketing Goal: To make 2,000 households in the target district aware that working smoke alarms save lives, and we’d fit one for free.

Interested
Of those 2,000 whom we made aware, we estimate half of them, 1,000, would want to find out more. Therefore, we must provide a place for them to go to for more information – on and off-line.

Tactical Marketing Goal: For 700 unique visitors to come to our Informative Landing Page and 300 to read the ‘more information’ leaflet (note: no way of measuring this accurately).

Considering
We need people considering getting a free smoke alarm fitted to book an appointment with us. Therefore, we need to direct them to a website landing page to fill in a form or a free phone number.  We know that for every two households who booked, only one would go on to have a working smoke alarm fitted.

Tactical Marketing Goal: To get 400 households to book an appointment.

Adopting
This meant the number of people for who we fitted a smoke alarm. We have to make sure we confirm the appointment several times, via email and phone call to make sure they are in when we turn up. This guarantees that 50% of those who book an appointment will have a smoke alarm fitted.

Tactical Marketing Goal: To turn up and fit 200 smoke alarms.

Loyalty
Once we fit the smoke alarm, we want them to tell their neighbours and refer them to us, so they get their free smoke alarm fitted too.

Tactical Marketing Goal: To get a fit for a further 50 smoke alarms via referrals.

3. Choosing your marketing tactics

Once you have your tactical marketing goals identified, and assuming you know your audience, it should be easy to choose the right marketing tactics to achieve your goals. 

Using the example above here is how to take one marketing goal and create the right tactics:

Tactical Marketing GoalMarketing TacticsBudget/ time
To make 2,000 households in the target district aware that working smoke alarms save lives, and we’d fit one for free.
  • Facebook advertising
  • Bus advertising
  • Local radio advertising

All tactics are suitable to the people in this district.

£3,000 over six weeks

You can see how this should continue, with each goal having relevant marketing tactics chosen to achieve it. 

Conclusion:
Whatever your organisation, it is possible to set realistic marketing objectives that achieve the organisation’s goals. 

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